Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #294529

    DKEG
    Participant

    I know some of you camp with a hammock instead of a tent. Not being able to sleep on the ground, I borrowed a Eno Hammock from Wrench and tried it this weekend. I have some observations and then questions.

    1. I definitely slept better then on a pad on the ground

    2. I flipped over twice before I got the hang of getting in it. After that it was fine, like boating in a canoe.

    3. Set up was OK. Since I had a lot of trees to play with, I experimented a little. I did find the straps really need to be redesigned. It took a while to find the proper length to hold the hammock taut. I set the hammock up a tight as I could get it. It was about 3 feet off the ground. I found myself about 3 inches off ground and shaped like a horse shoe in the morning. With the straps only having loop holes every 5 to 6 inches it does not give you any way of tightening the hammock after it settles. I think a ratcheting device would be the answer if you could make a lite weight version of one.

    4. I think you really need a pad under you in any weather below 65 to 70 deg.

    5. Wrench does not have the mosquito net option. So I can’t comment on that. But it does need one.

    6. The rain fly worked well. It poured all night Saturday.

    7. It packs up nice and small.

    Now the questions. How is the Hennessy? I have watched the videos. It may just be me but I think it looks to be harder to set up. A lot of knot tying in the video I saw. You would have the same issues with slippage. It may be able to re tighten the hammock easier. I looks easy to get in. Not sure about having to sleep at angle? Is that a big deal?

    One last question, bottom zip or side zip. Which do you think is better.

    #490651

    jon_baler
    Participant

    You’re free to borrow my Hennessy if you want. I love sleeping in my Hennessy.

    I made a popular modification to mine on the main supports to use d-rings and straps, instead of having to tie the strings. Adds a tiny amount of weight, but much easier to put up.

    I usually set it up relatively tight and higher off the ground to compensate for the sag. I don’t find the sag to be a problem. I think the above modification also helped alleviate some of the sag, but was never a big issue before either. I would just re-tighten it once after sitting it in for 30 seconds, and that would be good enough.

    I’ve only used the bottom entry. Works well enough, but kind of a pain if you use a pad since you have to push it out of way temporarily.

    These are also popular hammock tents. Spearman has one: http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/blackbirds.php

    #490650

    Bandit
    Participant

    @jon_baler 232775 wrote:

    These are also popular hammock tents. Spearman has one: http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/blackbirds.php

    I was looking to buy a Eno or Hennessey last year, but did a bunch of research and ended up with a Warbonnet Blackbird. Really like it. It has a built in bug screen and is a side entry model.

    I do find that finding the right tension is difficult at first and I still require practice. You definitely need a lot of sag in them, which makes picking the right trees really important.

    I currently use a pad when it is colder than 65 degrees, but I am considering getting a underquilt. I think a hammock is more comfortable without a pad.

    Shug has more information on the Warbonnet in the link.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yxevtxnkmkk

    #490654

    patrickgmiller
    Participant

    I spent a month bike touring with a Hennesy. It gets cold and windy so I packed one of those emergency blankets, which did plenty to keep me warm. Tying to a tree only takes a few minutes, really easy after a try or two. I got the big rainfly, which takes longer to set up, but covers a bike and gear easily, however some of the guides have gotten ripped out during high wind–later I just used bungee cords.

    Bottom entrance works fine, never have fallen out. It’s light and small and comfortable.

    #490649

    TiRyder
    Participant

    I had a Hennesy and used in Bikepacking for 1 2 night trip. I felt like I was the meat in a big ol burrito waiting for a bear. I probably didn’t have it setup up exactly right, but also have some back issues and the curved sleeping position didnt help. I also felt constricted in it.

    I can see how they may work for others, just not me. I sold it on ebay and bought a Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1. 2.1-2.8 pounds, and the poles are short enough to either go in a frame bag, or strap directly to top or down tube. Sleeping got much better, and I felt more rested and less sore in the morning.

    #490652

    jon_baler
    Participant

    @tiryder 232786 wrote:

    I had a Hennesy and used in Bikepacking for 1 2 night trip. I felt like I was the meat in a big ol burrito waiting for a bear. I probably didn’t have it setup up exactly right, but also have some back issues and the curved sleeping position didnt help. I also felt constricted in it.

    I can see how they may work for others, just not me. I sold it on ebay and bought a Big Agnes Seedhouse SL1. 2.1-2.8 pounds, and the poles are short enough to either go in a frame bag, or strap directly to top or down tube. Sleeping got much better, and I felt more rested and less sore in the morning.

    I’ve done a couple of 4-5 night biking trips, and had no soreness issues from sleeping in the hammock. My buddy and his 65+ year old Dad through hiked the entire AT with hammock tents.

    #490653

    jon_baler
    Participant

    picking trees farther apart helps minimize sag too.

    #728304

    Exin
    Participant

    More and more identifications have been done for the candidates. The reform and paper writing service is implied for the official account for the use of the terms for the candidates in this ambit and field.

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